Top Foods That Are High In Calcium

If you’re looking to increase your calcium intake, you’re in luck – there are plenty of high-calcium foods out there. From dairy products to leafy green vegetables, here are some of the best sources of calcium around. So why not add a few of these powerhouse foods to your diet and see if you notice a difference? You may be surprised at how much easier it is to get all the calcium your body needs when you have some go-to options up your sleeve. Keep reading for more on the top high-calcium foods, and be sure to check out our recipes section for ideas on how to incorporate them into your meal plan!

Soybeans

Soybeans are a great source of calcium and also provide over 20 different essential nutrients. They are split into three categories: green (also known as edamame), mature, and processed soy products like tofu and soy milk. The calcium content of the beans varies depending on their preparation – boiled soybeans, for example, contain about 127mg of calcium per one-half cup serving, whereas firm tofu contains 94mg of calcium per half-cup. Soybeans provide a good source of protein and potassium as well.

Salmon

Salmon is a good source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids, but it’s also a good source of calcium – about three ounces contains 136mg which is 14 percent of your daily value. In fact, salmon has as much calcium as sardines. If you don’t like fish or can’t eat it for some reason, canned pink salmon will provide you with 130mg per half a cup – that’s more than 10 percent of your daily value. You can also use canned sockeye or pink salmon in recipes such as chowder to get more calcium into your diet without having to eat too much fish. Milk alternatives: Soy milk and almond

Almonds

Almonds are perhaps best known for their rich vitamin E content – in fact, they’re second only to sunflower seeds when it comes to vitamin E content. But almonds have a number of other nutritional benefits as well, including high amounts of fiber as well as trace minerals including magnesium and copper. In addition, one serving of almonds provides about 20 percent of your daily calcium needs. Almonds make a great snack or addition to salads or other dishes.

Quinoa

Quinoa has become increasingly popular as more people have discovered its health benefits. This superfood contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a complete protein source – something that can be hard to come by on a vegetarian or vegan diet. In addition, quinoa is a great way to get calcium into your family’s diet – half a cup provides 121mg of the nutrient. If you’re looking for an easy way to prepare quinoa, check out our simple stovetop method.

Collard Greens

If you’re looking for an easy way to get calcium into your family’s diet, why not try collard greens? These are very similar to kale in terms of nutrition – they are low in calories but high in vitamins K, A, and C as well as iron, fiber, and calcium. Half a cup of cooked collard greens provides about 132mg of calcium – that’s 15 percent of the daily value. While raw collard greens have six times more calcium than spinach, if you want to eat them raw it is best not to cook them first. This reduces their bitterness and makes them more palatable.

Beans And Lentils

Beans and lentils have been touted as a superfood for years, largely due to their high fiber content. However, they’re also good sources of calcium – one cup provides about 334mg of the nutrient – that’s 34 percent of your daily value. It should be noted, however, that the calcium in beans and lentils is harder to absorb than other kinds so you may want to eat these foods with a food rich in vitamin D or take a supplement if you don’t get enough sunlight. Also, keep in mind that beans and lentils are high in both starch and sugar so they should be eaten in moderation. If you do decide to try baked beans or split pea soup, you’ll find that they’re also good sources of calcium – a portion of either provides about 30mg of the nutrient.

Oranges

Oranges are a great source of vitamin C, potassium, and fiber, but they’re also a good source of calcium. One medium orange provides about 60mg of calcium – that’s 7 percent of the daily value. Oranges make a great snack or addition to your breakfast or lunch routine. You can also use orange juice as a way to get more calcium into your diet – just be sure to check the label to make sure that it is fortified with calcium. Oranges are also a good source of pectin, which is great for your heart.

Spinach

Like collard greens, spinach is very high in calcium. However, there’s a catch – per calorie, you don’t get as much of the nutrient from this leafy green. This means that if you’re looking to increase your calcium intake, it may be better to rely on other high-calcium foods. However, for those watching their weight or counting calories, spinach provides a good way to sneak calcium into your diet – half a cup contains about 85mg of the nutrient and only has about 35 calories. This means that you can eat plenty of spinach without blowing your calorie budget for the day.

Milk

While not all types of milk contain a good source of calcium, drinking milk is a great way to get it into your diet. On its own, one cup of low-fat or skim milk provides about 300mg of calcium – that’s 30 percent of the daily value. Low-fat cheese and yogurt are also good sources of calcium – half a cup contains about 240mg and 230mg, respectively. Cheese does have more calories than plain yogurt, however, so keep this in mind if you’re watching your weight.

Sardines

Fish is often lauded as a superfood due to its high content of omega-3 fatty acids. But did you know that sardines are also a good source of calcium? In fact, one can of sardines contains about 325mg of the nutrient – that’s more than a third of the daily value. They’re also a good source of protein and vitamin D. If you’re not a fan of sardines, other oily fish such as salmon and tuna are also high in calcium. Also, don’t forget to eat the bones – they are a good source of calcium too!

Cheese

Many kinds of cheese are high in calcium, but if you’re looking for a low-fat source of the nutrient, cottage cheese is the way to go. One cup provides about 180mg of calcium – that’s 18 percent of your daily value. However, it also has more sugar than hard cheeses so should be eaten in moderation. If you do choose hard cheese as opposed to cottage cheese, Swiss and cheddar are both good choices – one ounce contains about 7 percent of your daily value. Cottage cheese makes an excellent accompaniment to fruit or toast while hard cheeses can be added to sandwiches or salads.

Conclusion

There are many foods that are high in calcium and can help you meet your daily needs. Try incorporating some of these into your diet to make sure you’re getting enough of the nutrient. If you’re not a fan of dairy products, don’t worry – there are plenty of other foods that will help you reach your goals. Just be sure to read the labels carefully to find out how much calcium each food contains. And if you still need more, consider taking a supplement. Calcium is an important nutrient for keeping your bones healthy, so it’s important to make sure you’re getting enough of it.